OVERVIEW

BUILT FOR CAREERS

The built environment has an incredibly diverse choice of career paths to offer. Learn more about each of these exciting careers and see which UCEM programmes might be suitable for you by exploring the jobs below.

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Agency: residential or commercial

Specialists in this area are concerned with the valuation, leasing, letting, purchase and sale of either residential or commercial properties.

Practice area

Agency (commercial or residential)

What skills are required?
  • Excellent communication skills and the ability to work well with clients and other professionals
  • Commercial awareness
  • Drive and the ability to build relationships and networks and generate new business
  • General IT skills
  • Good organisational skills and time management
  • A driving licence is usually required to travel to properties
What qualifications are required? The requirement for formal qualifications depends on where you work and what you do. Commercial agents are often expected to have a non-cognate or RICS accredited degree and work towards chartered status with the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS). Some residential agents may also be chartered surveyors, particularly if working with complex or prestigious markets.

There are alternative qualifications for those working in residential sales or lettings, which can often be achieved whilst working.

What is it like in practice? Agents role are busy, varied and active. You may need to work weekends and evenings. The work can include meeting vendors or landlords to talk about marketing their property, researching local markets and trends and collecting evidence to reach an accurate market value.

You will be involved in different stages of the disposal, ensuring all paperwork is completed, managing the sale or letting as it processes and ensuring regulations are followed.

Work environment Split between office and site work, with regular meetings with vendors and applicants.
Employment opportunities Commercial agents usually work for professional firms, who often recruit graduates on to graduate development programmes, giving participants the opportunity to work across a number of different departments before choosing their specialisms. Smaller firms recruit all year round, offering both specialist and general practice work.

Whilst many students have an RICS accredited degree, there are opportunities for non-cognate graduates to join a firm and study for a property qualification whilst working.

Estate agencies regular recruit and often advertise locally and online.

There are also degree apprenticeships in real estate surveying and estate agency available.

More information Visit RICS

Visit Property Mark

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management

MSc Real Estate

MBA Construction and Real Estate

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Working with different people, including the general public, clients and specialists
  • Doing deals and making transactions through leasing and selling properties

See more skills used in agency work:

  • Using verbal and written communication skills
  • Combining work in an office with visiting properties with clients
Architectural technology

Architect technologists turn architects’ designs into sustainable constructions. They are specialists in the technology of construction, selecting the best materials and processes for the project, identifying potential design issues and analysing architectural plans and drawings.

Practice area

Architectural technology

What skills are required?
  • Creativity, art and design skills
  • Good written communication and presentation skills
  • Teamwork and the ability to work with clients and other professionals
  • Maths and IT skills
  • An analytical mind with strong problem-solving ability
  • Strong planning and organisation skills
What qualifications are required? Chartered architectural technologists will have completed a relevant degree and be able to demonstrate their experience as an architectural technologist. Architectural technology degree courses are available, and alternatives include part time study or apprenticeships.

Architectural technicians are not required to have professional or academic qualifications but may do so.

What is it like in practice? Chartered architect technologists often work as part of a multi-disciplinary team, liaising with architects, surveyors and other construction professionals. Chartered architectural technologists may be project managers, leading a project from inception to completion. The role can include selecting materials and processes, surveying sites, assessing environmental impacts and working with planning and building regulation and other legislation. Architectural technologists often use specialist design software such as CAD and REVIT.
Work environment Split between office and site work, meetings with clients and other professionals.
Employment opportunities Employers include architect practices, property developers, construction firms and local government. Architectural technologists can also be self-employed.

Degree courses in architectural technology are available as well as apprenticeships.

More information Visit RICS

Visit Property Mark

Visit CIAT

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Building Surveying

MSc Building Surveying

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using visual intelligence to read and interpret plans, data, and designs.
  • Using science, technology and design in innovative ways, such as using VR to bring a design to life or researching alternative building materials

See more skills used by architectural technologists:

  • Project management
  • Creativity and problem solving
  • Understanding how buildings are constructed and materials used in the process required
Architecture

Architects design new buildings, extensions or alterations to existing structures and advise on the restoration and conservation of historic properties.

Practice Area

Architecture

What skills are required?
  • Creativity and design skills
  • Good written communication and presentation skills
  • Teamwork and the ability to work with clients and other professionals
  • Maths and IT skills
What qualifications are required? The typical route to qualification involves five years study at university and completion of a minimum of two years’ practical experience. Alternatives include part time study or apprenticeships. On completion of the training, you can apply to register as an architect with the Architects Registration Board (ARB)
What is it like in practice? Architects often work in consultancies or practices, as part of a multi-disciplinary team. Work is project based. Clients range from residential house-owners to those commissioning state of the art public and private buildings.
Work Environment Split between office and site work, meetings with clients and other professionals.
Employment opportunities Architects work for private practices, central and local government. Other employers include construction companies, commercial and industrial organisations and retailers and manufacturers. There are also apprenticeships in Architecture available
More information Visit RIBA

Visit CIAT

Visit Prospects

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using science, technology and design to plan new and enhance existing buildings
  • Project management

See more skills used in architecture:

  • Combining work in an office and on site
  • Visual intelligence and perceptual skills to use plans, charts and diagrams
  • Creativity and problem solving to create meet client requirements and environmental factors
  • Understanding how buildings are constructed and materials used in the process
Arts and antiques

Surveyors in this specialism are involved in the valuation, sale, purchase, management and conservation of personal property, arts and antiques. This includes, but is not limited to, fine art, collectables, heritage assets, antiques and jewellery, whether in public or private ownership.

Practice Area

Personal property/art and antiques

What skills are required?
  • An interest in arts and antiques
  • Research skills
  • Attention to details
  • Confident communication skills
  • Practical skills for conservation work.
  • Ability to communicate and work well with clients
What qualifications are required? Surveyors in this area often have qualifications in art history and valuation and may have worked in auction houses or similar areas.
What is it like in practice? This area is quite varied, but work could include visiting sales rooms, using expert knowledge to provide detailed inventories and valuation reports of art, antiques and jewellery for insurance and replacement, expert witness work and the sale and purchase of items at auction or privately.

Employers can include auction houses, and art and antique valuation firms.

The hours can vary, and you may be expected to travel.

Work environment Office based but with travel to sales, auction houses and clients. Some overseas travel may be required.
Employment opportunities Specialists in this area can work for auction houses, conservation charities and specialist firms.
More information Visit RICS

Visit SOFAA

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management

MSc Real Estate

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Working with different people (such as clients, colleagues and the general public)
  • Researching and explaining specialist data and information relating to arts and antiques

See more skills used by arts and antiques specialists:

  • Using verbal and written communication skills
  • Analysing and identifying patterns in data
Building control

Building control surveyors ensure that the design and construction of buildings comply with building regulations and other legislation. Building control surveyors work on new and altered buildings, focusing on areas including fire safety, energy conservation and structural stability.

Practice area

Building control

What skills are required?
  • Good communication skills
  • Diplomacy, negotiation and the ability to remain impartial
  • Ability to work well with technical standards and subjects
What qualifications are required? An RICS accredited degree is often required, and opportunities to work and study towards a degree may be available
What is it like in practice? Building control surveyors may work for a local authority or in the private sector.  You will usually work as part of a team and whilst usual office hours apply, you may need to work flexibly to provide a 24-hour emergency call out service.

The job can be an active one, visiting and inspecting building sites while construction is in progress, testing works, writing reports and issuing appropriate certification.

Work environment Split between office and site work, often with frequent regional travel
Employment opportunities Opportunities exist for trainees, newly qualified individuals and qualified surveyors looking for a new career path

There are also degree apprenticeships in building control available

More information Visit RICS

Visit LABC

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Building Surveying

MSc Building Surveying

BSc (Hons) Building Control

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Understanding how buildings are constructed how the materials used in the process can affect the safety of a structure
  • Working with different people (such as clients, colleagues and the general public) to influence actions and ensure they comply with legislation

See more skills used by building control surveyors:

  • Using verbal and written communication skills to explain technical matters and write reports
  • Using science, technology and design to understand the links between construction methods and materials on safety
  • People management and leadership
  • Researching and explaining data in specialist areas
Building services engineering

Building services engineers design, install and maintain services such as acoustics, heating, lighting and power into buildings to enable them to work effectively.

Practice area

Building services engineering

What skills are required?
  • Strong communication skills
  • Problem-solving ability
  • Analytical skills
What qualifications are required? Entry into building services engineering is typically via an engineering degree or similar qualification. Both under and post graduate degrees are available. Building service engineers may be members of the Chartered Institute of Building Service Engineers.
What is it like in practice? BSE can work on a huge range of buildings, including domestic, commercial and industrial projects.  They also work on historic, conservation and iconic buildings, making and adapting buildings to meet the needs of the people who live and work in them.

Work includes project management, design of systems in areas such as mechanical design, lighting, vertical transport, electrical engineering etc. Building services engineers usually specialise one particular area.

Work environment Your time will be split between working on site and working from an office. Team working and working with other professionals is usually required as well as presentation and liaison with clients.
Employment opportunities Opportunities exist in the UK, Europe and globally. Firms usually expect a relevant degree and relevant experience for more senior roles.

Most building services engineers work for employers, although some freelance and self-employed opportunities may be available.

There are also degree apprenticeships in building services engineering available.

More information Visit CIBSE

Visit UCAS

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Construction Management

MSc Construction Management

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using science, technology and design to create efficient and practical solutions to the use of energy and resources
  • Using visual intelligence and perceptual skills to use plans, charts and diagrams

See more skills used by building services engineers:

  • Researching and explaining data in specialist areas
  • Working in teams
  • Maths skills
  • Using specialist IT programmes and equipment
Building surveying

Building surveyors provide professional advice on property and construction projects, which can range from modest adaptations and repairs to multi-million-pound structures

Practice area

Building surveying

Introduction Building surveyors also inspect new and existing buildings, identifying defects and advising repair, maintenance and restoration. They may also implement preventative measures to keep buildings in good condition and look for ways to make buildings sustainable.

You may also project manage building works and some building surveyors offer a design service too.

What skills are required?
  • Report writing, good communication skills
  • The ability to work well with clients and other professionals.
  • Commercial awareness as many building surveyors work in fee earning roles.
  • Technical skills and a practical mind set.
  • Good IT skills
What qualifications are required? An RICS accredited degree is often required, most building surveyors will work towards chartered status with the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS)
What is it like in practice? Building surveyors work in all aspects of property including residential, commercial, leisure, agricultural and industrial markets and niche areas can include building conservation, insurance, rights to light, party wall matters and dilapidations. Building surveyors provide professional, technical, expert advice to clients and need an excellent level of technical knowledge as well as the ability to work with clients and other professionals.

Building surveyors can work in the public sector, private practice or may be self-employed.

The job can be an active one, such as visiting and inspecting buildings and climbing into roof spaces so you may need a level of physical fitness.

Building surveyors can cover large geographical areas and so a driving licence is usually required.

Work environment Split between office and site work
Employment opportunities Firms often advertise for graduate with a building surveying degree, although trainee roles are sometimes available.

There are also degree apprenticeships in building surveying available

More information Visit RICS

Visit Prospects

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Building Surveying

MSc Building Surveying

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Understanding how buildings are constructed how the materials used affect the performance of a structure
  • Using science, technology and design to understand the links between construction methods and materials to identify problems and identify solutions

See more skills used by building surveyors:

  • Using verbal and written communication skills to explain technical matters and write reports
  • Researching and explaining data in specialist areas
  • Working with different people such as clients, colleagues and the general public
  • Using visual intelligence and perceptual skills to use plans, charts and diagrams
Civil engineering

Civil engineering covers a wide range of job roles and specialisms including consulting civil engineers who design projects and contracting civil engineers who take plans and make them into real structures.

Practice area

Civil engineering

What skills are required?
  • Strong communication skills
  • Creativity and problem-solving ability
  • Analytical skills
  • Maths and IT skills
  • Teamwork and the ability to liaise well with professionals from other disciplines
  • An interest in the design and structure of buildings
  • Technical competence
  • Project and people management skills
What qualifications are required? Entry into civil engineering is typically via an engineering degree or similar qualification, or through an apprenticeship. Both under and post graduate degrees are available. Civil engineers can work towards the professional status with the Institute of Civil Engineers.
What is it like in practice? Civil engineers can work on the contracting or consulting part of a build project. The work is quite different and good research is recommended before choosing one path over another. Engineering graduates will use their professional expertise to ensure the designs are implemented correctly, to manage teams on site and ensure the projects run to time and budget.
Work environment Contracting engineers will spend more time on site, working with a particular project for perhaps a year. Consulting engineers tend to work on multiple projects and be more office based, with client liaison, meetings and presentations key part of the role.
Employment opportunities Opportunities exist in the UK, Europe and globally. Firms usually expect a relevant degree and relevant experience for more senior roles. Employers include consultancies, global infrastructure firms, and construction firms.
More information Visit ICE

Visit UCAS

Visit Prospects (opens new window)

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Construction Management

MSc Construction Management

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using science, technology and design to create infrastructure solutions
  • Using visual intelligence and perceptual skills to use plan, charts and diagrams

See more skills used by civil engineers:

  • Researching and explaining data in specialist areas
  • Working in teams
  • Maths skills
  • Using specialist IT programmes and equipment
Construction logistics manager

Construction logistics managers develop and optimise site logistics solutions to meet the needs of construction projects. They are responsible for all aspects of the logistics supply chain and stores management.

Practice area

Construction logistics manager

Introduction Logistics managers manage the movement of people, goods and equipment at the construction site and control site facilities management.
What skills are required?
  • Excellent communication skills
  • Ability to build relationships and engage and influence individuals at all levels
  • The ability to deal with complex logistics issues along with analytical, problem solving and organisational skills
  • Strong planning skills with the ability to handle multiple projects through to completion and to manage competing priorities.
  • A commitment to quality improvement and the ability promote key messages.
  • IT skills (e.g. PowerPoint, Visio, Word, Excel)
  • Excellent people management skills
  • A creative, flexible “can-do” mind set, open to change and new ideas
What qualifications are required?
  • A relevant degree may be required in areas such as construction or logistics
  • Other specialist qualifications include CSCS and SMSTS/SSSTS and traffic management qualifications
  • Current full UK driving licence
  • Health and safety

Construction managers may work towards accreditation with the Chartered Institute of Building.

What is it like in practice? A construction logistic manager’s role is a busy and varied one which requires the ability to manage a complex workload with multiple stakeholders.

Activities could include:

  • Planning/programming site set up plans to move labour, plant (such as cranes) and materials around site efficiently for each phase of the construction project
  • Working out how to keep the site secure and safe for workers and visitors
  • Creating policies and procedures
  • Attending site meetings and keep records of meetings and staff training
  • Managing the supply chain
  • Understanding procurement arrangements and control materials in and out of site
  • Planning how the different specialists and contractors can access and work on site to maximise efficiency and achieve the best cost and time management.
  • Ensure the site works safely, creating a site-specific safety manual and emergency plans, and ensuring first aid cover and equipment is present
  • Create a system to communicate information around the site, for example noticeboards, email distribution lists, monitor displays and web pages
Work environment Your time will be split between working on site and working from an office, which may be in temporary premises on the site. The role requires working with a range of internal and external stakeholders.
Employment opportunities Applicants often have experience in other construction roles alongside relevant qualifications. Firms do advertise graduate entry level roles, supporting other experienced logistics managers. Logistics managers are in demand by construction firms on both residential and commercial sites in the UK and globally.
More information Visit CIOB
Relevant UCEM programmes MSc Quantity Surveying

BSc (Hons) Construction Management

MSc Construction Management

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Creative problem solving in complex scenarios
  • Working with different people and teams such as clients, contractors and specialists

See more skills used by construction logistics managers:

  • Using visual intelligence and perceptual skills to use plan, charts and diagrams
  • Project management
  • People management
Construction manager

Construction managers are responsible for ensuring that a building project is completed safely, within an agreed time frame and budget.

Practice Area

Construction manager

Introduction They manage the practical side of the build, supervising the trades and contractors as well as working with other building professionals such as architects, surveyors and planners.

Construction managers ensure everyone works to an agreed plan, closely monitoring progress, inspecting work, setting budgets and dealing with contracts.

They may oversee a whole site, or a big part of a large-scale, complex project.

What skills are required?
  • Strong communication and leadership skills
  • Planning and organisation
  • Strong attention to detail
  • Commercial awareness
  • Maths and IT skills
What qualifications are required? A relevant degree may be required.

Construction managers may work towards accreditation with the Chartered Institute of Building

What is it like in practice? Due to the nature of the role, it is project based. Some construction managers are self-employed, moving from one contract to another. However, many people work for one employer. Construction management is a busy, demanding role so you will need the ability to work under pressure.

You may need some flexibility on working hours as projects near completion.

Work environment Your time will be spent mostly on site and offices are often in temporary premises on the site. More senior roles can find their time split between working on site and working from an office, or in meetings and presentations with clients. The role requires working with clients, architects and construction engineering professionals on a project and holding meetings to keep the project on time and on budget.
Employment opportunities Firms often advertise for graduates with a relevant qualification, although non-cognate degrees, particularly those in maths and engineering subjects are also valued. Construction managers can work towards more senior levels or develop specialisms such as SHEQ or project management.

There are also degree apprenticeships in construction management are also available.

More information Visit CIOB
Relevant UCEM programmes MSc Quantity Surveying

BSc (Hons) Construction Management

MSc Construction Management

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Managing complex projects
  • Understanding how buildings are constructed and materials used in the process
  • Working with different people and teams such as clients, contractors and specialists

See more skills used by construction managers:

  • People management
  • Using visual intelligence and perceptual skills to use plans, charts and diagrams
  • Creativity and problem solving to create meet client and project requirements and budgets
  • The ability to multi-task, make decisions and handle conflicting deadlines
Contracts manager

Contracts managers roles can be quite varied, but essentially, they focus on facilitating, negotiating, developing and evaluating contracts for commercial construction services.

Practice area

Contracts (construction) manager

Introduction Construction contracts managers look at improving the contract process, ensuring value for money and legal and industry compliance.

They may act as the main point of contact for clients, site and project managers, meeting with clients, developing proposals agreeing budgets and timescales and problem solving.

What skills are required?
  • Excellent communication and relationship building skills ls
  • Data and Information management skills
  • Ability to interpret perceptual, numerical and verbal data
  • Time and workload management
  • Planning and organisation
  • Project management
  • Commercial awareness
What qualifications are required? Requirements vary. A relevant degree may be required but key experiences could include:

  • Site management experience
  • A comprehensive understanding of health and safety legislation and standards
  • IT skills and project management software
  • Knowledge of the relevant construction forms of contracts and procedures
  • Specialist qualifications such as SMSTS
What is it like in practice? Roles can be busy and demanding, working with multiple stake holders and using a wide range of information and skills. Roles can include more hands-on technical work such as surveying, scoping and diagnosis of issues.

Due to the nature of the role, it is project based. Contracts managers may be self-employed, moving from one contract to another. However, many people work for one employer. Contracts management is a busy, demanding role so you will need the ability to work under pressure.

Work environment Your time will be spent mainly in the office with some time on site and in meetings.
Employment opportunities Contracts managers may have a site or construction management background, or train directly as a contracts manager. Trainee and entry level contract management positions are available, alongside roles for more experienced workers. Employers are often construction companies, but client-side jobs exist too.

International opportunities are available, usually for more experienced workers.

More information Visit CIOB
Relevant UCEM programmes MSc Quantity Surveying

BSc (Hons) Construction Management

MSc Construction Management

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using negotiation and influencing skills
  • Analyse/interpret numerical and verbal information and data

See more skills used by contract managers:

  • Relationship building
  • Researching and explaining data
Dispute and arbitration

Dispute and arbitration specialists provide services that assist clients in avoiding, mitigating and resolving construction disputes. They will be used when a dispute is anticipated or arisen and when the parties involved in a contract need to reach agreement.

Practice area

Dispute and arbitration

What skills are required?
  • Good written and presentation skills
  • Ability to analyse information and handle large amounts of data
  • IT skills
  • Communication and client skills
  • Planning and organisation
  • Ability to manage complex construction projects
  • Ability to work with other experts and specialists
  • An interest in in dispute resolution, legal services, claims, arbitration and expert witness work.
What qualifications are required? An RICS accredited degree, usually in quantity surveying or construction management areas.

Chartered status with the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyor (MRICS) and or chartered membership of the Chartered Institute of Building.

What is it like in practice? Professionals in this specialism provide dispute resolution services across all sectors of the land, property and built environment.

Work includes advocacy, expert witness, adjudicate disputes in construction contracts and expert witness work.  Work is often client based, although you may represent your own employer in the negotiation process. Work can be domestic or international.

You will be collecting, analysing, summarising and reporting back on a range of data, working with other professionals and clients. You may need to present evidence in a legal setting such as a court or legal panel as well as travelling to sites and meetings.

Work Environment You can expect to be mainly office based, although you may need to visit sites too. Although usual office hours apply, projects may require flexibility and travel to sites and projects both domestic and international.
Employment opportunities Employers include construction companies and specialist consultancies. Most people in this area have a background in quantity surveying or construction management although entry level jobs do exist.
More information Visit RICS
Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying

MSc Quantity Surveying

BSc (Hons) Construction Management

MSc Construction Management

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using verbal, written and maths skills to negotiate
  • Working with different people and teams such as clients, contractors and specialists

See more skills used by dispute and arbitration specialists:

  • Analysing and identifying patterns in data
  • Researching and explaining data
  • Doing deals and making transactions
Environmental surveying

Environmental surveyors provide expertise across projects in real estate, land and construction.

Practice area

Environmental surveying

Introduction They assess the environmental challenges faced by developers, landowners and investors. Key areas include environmental management, land use and contaminated land and environmental auditing.
What skills are required?
  • Excellent communication skills and the ability to work well with clients and other professionals.
  • Report writing
  • Commercial awareness
  • Client focused
  • Project management
  • Problem solving
  • Technical skills and mind set
What qualifications are required? Environmental surveyors usually gain their experience in general practice work including residential, commercial and rural areas. Employers may require a RICS accredited degree, or if you have a non-cognate degree, you could undertake a RICS accredited postgraduate degree. Surveyors can work towards Chartered or Associate Membership of the RICS.
What is it like in practice? Environmental surveyors offer expert services to clients who include developers, construction firms, local authorities and utility companies. The nature of the work means that each project will be unique, requiring creative solutions within a regulatory framework. Projects require understanding and consideration of many factors, balancing commercial needs with environmental risk management throughout construction and maintainance.
Work Environment A combination of office and site work, often in rural or challenging environments. Your role will include meetings with clients and other professionals, research and may include expert witness work in court.
employment opportunities There is demand and opportunity for qualified environmental professionals due to a high media profile, coupled with demands on natural resources worldwide. Employers are often specialist niche consultancies, but can include public and private sector bodies.

Specialists in this area may have come from a wide range of backgrounds, including surveying and environmental roles.

Graduates with a non-cognate or unrelated degree can study a RICS accredited degree at post graduate level. There are also relevant BSc degree courses available.

Degree apprenticeships in relevant areas may also be available.

More information Visit RICS
Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management

MSc Real Estate

MBA Construction and Real Estate

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using science, technology and design to assess environmental factors and impact
  • Using practical skills or technical skills or equipment to gather and assess data
  • Working with different people and teams such as clients, contractors and specialists

See more skills used by environmental surveyors:

  • Analysing and identifying patterns in data
  • Researching and explaining data
  • Using verbal and written communication skills
  • Using perceptual skills such as maps, charts and diagrams
  • Creativity and problem solving

References:

Facilities management

Facilities management is a diverse area, where specialists are responsible for the management of services and processes that support business operations.

Practice area

Facilities management

Introduction This can include the buildings and grounds, as well as services that support the working environment such as maintenance, cleaning, security, space management and security.
What skills are required?
  • Ability to use and interpret different types of data including designs, numbers and written reports and verbal information
  • Excellent organisational and planning skills
  • IT skills
  • Accuracy and attention to detail
  • Good oral, written and presentation skills.
  • A practical, logical and methodical mindset
  • The ability to multi-task, make decisions and handle conflicting deadlines
  • Leadership and effective people management
  • Procurement and negation skills
  • A practical, flexible and innovative approach to work
What qualifications are required? Entry into this profession is diverse and people may come from a range of backgrounds and qualifications. No particular degree is required but relevant areas can include business studies and hospitality as well as property and construction subjects.

Professional qualifications can be gained through the RICS and the IFMA.

What is it like in practice? In this diverse field you will have a range of responsibilities, which are dependent on the structure and size of the organisation. They will range from strategic planning to managing day to day operations, managing contractor and inhouse teams, and ensuring that services meet agreed level of performance along with health and safety and other legislative requirements.
Work environment You are likely to be based in business premises and some travel may be required. Work can be pressurised when working to deadlines or budgets. Work patterns may include shifts and weekends.
Employment opportunities Opportunities exist across the UK and globally. Employers include all types of businesses as well as property and construction firms and facilities management specialists.
More information Visit IFMA

Visit RICS

Visit Prospects

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management

MSc Real Estate

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Working with different people such as clients, colleagues and the general public
  • Using a range of information to make decisions including verbal and written communication, numbers

See more skills used by facilities managers:

  • Analysing and identifying patterns in data
  • People management
  • Understanding how buildings are constructed and perform
  • Creativity and problem solving

References:

Geomatics/land surveyor

Geomatics/land surveyors carry out measurements and collect and interpret data about areas of land, including information about boundaries, buildings and both natural and man-made features.

Practice area

Geomatics/land surveyor

What skills are required?
  • Numeracy and the ability to make mathematical calculations
  • The ability to understand and interpret data
  • Lateral and logical thinking
  • Excellent IT skills and an interest and confidence with new technology
  • Problem solving and analysis
What qualifications are required? A relevant degree is often required, degree subjects include geography, surveying degrees are other science, technology and engineering subjects.

Some firms may require a degree to be accredited by the RICS or similar professional body.

Geomatic surveyors can work towards accreditation with the RICS or the Chartered Institute of Building.

What is it like in practice? Geomatics surveyors often work on land which to be redeveloped or where built infrastructure (such as railways) is due to be repaired.

Work in this area often uses cutting edge technology such as robots and 3D scanners.

You will be frequently working outside, and travel is frequently required. You may need to stay away for home for periods of time, and some overseas opportunities may be available.

Work environment Time is split between site work and office work. You may work office hours or shifts.
Employment opportunities Geomatic surveyors could be employed by a range of employers, including construction firms, mining companies, local government, the oil and gas industry, and even work with archaeologists.

There may also be degree apprenticeships in this area available.

More information Visit RICS (opens new window)
Relevant UCEM programmes MSc Quantity Surveying

BSc (Hons) Construction Management

MSc Construction Management

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using science, technology and design to assess land and buildings
  • Using technical or practical skills and cutting-edge technology

See more skills used by geomatics surveyors:

  • Using perceptual and visual intelligence skills to interpret maps, charts and diagrams
  • Creativity and problem solving
  • Analysing and identifying patterns in data
  • Researching and explaining data

References:

Historic building conservation

Historic building conservation is a branch of building surveying. Specialists in this area work with iconic, prestigious and heritage buildings covering everything from day-to-day maintenance to the delivery of multi-million-pound redevelopment projects.

Practice area

Historic conservation

What skills are required?
  • Report writing
  • Good communication skills including negotiation nd influencing skills
  • Ability to work well with clients and other professionals.
  • Technical skills and a practical mind set.
  • Good IT skills
  • The ability to drive is usually required
What qualifications are required? An RICS accredited degree is often required, most building surveyors will work towards chartered status with the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS)

Surveyors in this area may also study for a postgraduate or specialist qualification.

What is it like in practice? Like other building surveyors, historic building surveyors provide professional, technical, expert advice to clients and need an excellent level of technical knowledge as well as the ability to work with clients and other professionals. Work could include historic building condition surveys, analysis and interpretation of historic structures and historical research.

The job can be an active one, such as visiting and inspecting buildings and climbing into roof spaces so you may need a level of physical fitness.

Surveyors can cover large geographical and rural areas and so a driving licence is usually required.

Work environment Split between office and site work.
Employment opportunities Employers include private practices, charities and government organisations.  There may be opportunities for building surveying graduates to train in this area employers such as the National Trust and English Heritage.

There are also degree apprenticeships in building surveying available

More information Visit RICS

Visit Prospects

Visit IHBC

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Building Surveying

MSc Building Surveying

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using science, technology and design to assess the condition of land and buildings and identify solutions
  • Researching, explaining and using data to protect, restore or repurpose historic real estate

See more skills used by historic building conservation surveyors:

  • Using perceptual and visual intelligence skills to interpret maps, charts and diagrams
  • Creativity and problem solving
  • Using technical or practical skills and cutting-edge technology
  • Working with different people such as clients, colleagues and the general public
  • Using verbal and written communication skills
Infrastructure

Infrastructure surveyors can work in a wide range of sub-sectors. The specialism combines project management with cost management to meet the needs of global requirements of infrastructure projects.

Practice area

Infrastructure

Introduction

Infrastructure surveyors can work in transport, energy, petrochemicals, oil and gas, mining and water industries.
What skills are required?
  • Leadership skills
  • Communication and client skills
  • Planning and organisation
  • Ability to understand and manage complex projects
  • Excellent maths and IT skills
  • Technical/engineering skills
What qualifications are required? Many employers will look for a RICS accredited degree, although engineering subjects are also sought after.

Many surveyors work towards chartered status with the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyor (MRICS) and or chartered membership of the Chartered Institute of Building.

What is it like in practice? Infrastructure surveyors can become specialists in a particular industry or develop specialism in particular geographical area. Work is often around delivering global projects and employers include private practice, developers, utility companies, international construction companies, regeneration projects and government organisations.

Specialisms include:

  • Materials science
  • Cost planning
  • Cost analysis
  • Procurement
  • Tendering
  • Cost control
  • Procurement
  • Time control
Work environment Your time will be split between working on site and working from an office, which may be in temporary premises on the site or may be a client’s office
Employment opportunities There are some graduate opportunities in this area and potential backgrounds include science technology, maths and engineering degree subjects, as well as quantity surveying and construction routes.

There are also degree apprenticeships in various surveying options which may be relevant.

More information Visit RICS

Visit CIOB

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying

MSc Quantity Surveying

BSc (Hons) Construction Management

MSc Construction Management

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using science, technology and design in sectors such as transport, energy, petrochemicals, and water
  • Managing complex projects

See more skills used by infrastructure surveyors:

  • Using different types of data including verbal, numerical and perceptual skills to interpret maps, charts and diagrams
  • Analysing and identifying patterns in data
  • Researching and explaining data
  • Doing deals and making transactions
  • Creativity and problem solving
  • People management and leadership
Management consultancy

Specialists in this area provide consultancy service to real estate clients, identifying and implementing business solutions at any stage of the land and property lifecycle. Real estate is defined as “property in the form of land or buildings”

Practice area

Management consultancy

What skills are required?
  • Excellent communication skills and the ability to work well with clients and other professionals.
  • Commercial awareness
  • Strategic planning
  • Economics, business and management skills
  • Financial analysis
What qualifications are required? A non-cognate or RICS accredited degree may be required, with most surveyors working towards chartered status with the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS).

Experience in real estate management, asset management and strategy are valuable.

What is it like in practice? Management consultants work for clients for whom real estate is a significant part of their business. They combine business management and strategy skills with professional knowledge and understanding of real estate industry and markets to meet client needs and commercial goals. Work could include development and implementation of global and domestic real estate strategies for a client’s portfolio, researching and writing a business case in support of your recommendations, and development of real estate policy.
Work environment Split between office and site work with significant client engagement and research.
Employment opportunities Include global real estate and construction firms and niche consultancies.

Whilst many students have an RICS accredited degree, there may be opportunities for non-cognate graduates to join a firm and study for a property qualification whilst working.

There are also degree apprenticeships in real estate surveying available.

More information Visit RICS

Visit Prospects

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management

MSc Real Estate

MBA Construction and Real Estate

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using business skills to support clients
  • Creativity and problem solving in all stages of property life cycle

See more skills used by management consultancy surveyors:

  • Using a wide range of data such as verbal, written, numerical and perceptual information
  • Analysing and identifying patterns in data
  • Project management
  • Working with different people (such as clients, colleagues and the general public)
Minerals and waste management

Specialists in this area advise on mineral extraction or waste management operations. Built environment knowledge, skills and experience are used to engage with landowners, the public and other built environment professionals.

Practice area

Minerals and waste management

What skills are required?
  • Excellent communication skills and the ability to work well with clients and other professionals.
  • Negotiation and consultation
  • Report writing
  • Commercial awareness
  • Client focused
  • Project management
  • Problem solving
  • Technical skills and mind set
What qualifications are required? Employers usually require a relevant degree from areas such as civil or mining engineering, earth sciences, economics, geography, geology or surveying.

This could be a RICS accredited degree, or if you have a non-cognate degree, you could undertake a RICS accredited postgraduate degree working towards MRICS status.

Apprenticeship degrees in the sector may also be available.

What is it like in practice? Surveyors in this area use their land and property skills at all stages of a project, from planning to re-use. They will apply their skills, using knowledge of mining, minerals and waste management.

Self-employment and freelance work are possible but not widespread.

Areas of work include planning, valuations, law, economics, and environmental assessment

Work environment A combination of office and site work often underground in mines or challenging environments. Your role will include meetings with clients and other professionals. Work can be physically demanding and active.
Employment opportunities Mining and engineering companies and consultancies both in the UK and abroad where minerals are found.

Graduates with a non-cognate or unrelated degree can study a RICS accredited degree at post graduate level. There are also relevant BSc degree courses available.

Degree apprenticeships in relevant areas may also be available.

More information Visit RICS
Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Construction Management

BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying

MSc Quantity Surveying

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management

MSc Real Estate

MBA Construction and Real Estate

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using scientific and technology knowledge of the mining and waste management sectors
  • Creativity and problem solving in all stages of property life cycle

See more skills used by minerals and waste management surveyors:

  • Using a wide range of data such as verbal, written, numerical and perceptual information
  • Analysing and identifying patterns in data
  • Project management
  • Working with different people (such as clients, colleagues and the general public)
Project management

Project managers are central to ensuring the successful completion of construction and development projects. They plan develop and project manage works from inception to completion.

Practice area

Project management

What skills are required?
  • Ability to use and interpret different types of data including designs, numbers and written reports
  • Excellent organisational and planning skills
  • Excellent IT skills
  • Accuracy and attention to detail
  • Good oral, written and presentation skills.
  • A practical, logical and methodical mindset
  • Creativity and problem solving
  • The ability to multi-task and handle conflicting deadlines
  • Leadership and effective people management
What qualifications are required? Most employers look for a relevant construction related degree or similar qualifications. Project managers may have a background or experience in quantity surveying or construction management.

Many project managers will work towards professional membership of the RICS (Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors) and/or the Chartered Institute of Building.

What is it like in practice? Project managers may work for a consultancy, servicing multiple clients or be employed in house. Their role is to represent the client’s interest, from developing the project brief to selecting, appointing and coordinating project teams. Project managers follow through the full construction programme, working closely with clients, consultants, contractors and other stakeholders.

Global opportunities exist for project managers, particularly those with post qualification experience.

Work environment A combination of site work, office work, client and other meetings. Project managers can cover large geographical areas and so a driving licence is usually required.
Employment opportunities Project managers are employed by architects and local authorities, but major employers are contractors, where they will be responsible for the delivery of time and budget construction projects.

There are also degree apprenticeships in project management available.

More information Visit RICS

Visit Go Construct

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying

MSc Quantity Surveying

BSc (Hons) Construction Management

MSc Construction Management

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Project management
  • People management and leadership

See more skills used by project management specialists:

  • Using a wide range of data such as verbal, written, numerical and perceptual information
  • Analysing and identifying patterns in data
  • Working with different people (such as clients, colleagues and the general public)
Property finance and investment

Property finance and investment is a specialism of real estate and surveying and has its own RICS APC pathway.

Practice area

Property finance and investment

Introduction An investment and property surveyor manages their clients’ property portfolios to maximise returns through asset management and buying or selling. It includes services relating to property finance advice or provision, or indirect property investment.

Although the focus is on the financial attributes of property, rather than its physical attributes, you also require experience and knowledge of property to carry out tasks such as inspecting buildings.

What skills are required?
  • Numeracy
  • Financial modelling
  • Analytical skills
  • Excellent communication skills and the ability to work well with clients and other professionals
  • Report writing
  • Commercial awareness
What qualifications are required? Employers may require a RICS accredited (or other relevant) degree, with graduates working towards MRICS or AssocRICS status.
What is it like in practice? Investment surveyors may work for banks or other financial institutions or for specialist consultancies working for clients.

The work can involve sourcing and managing deals, providing expert consultancy, collecting and analysing data and working with clients and other professionals.

Drive and motivation are important to work in this very client focused arena.

Usual office hours with some domestic or international travel sometimes needed. A driving licence may be required.

Work environment Mainly office with some site work.
Employment opportunities Employers often look for graduates with transactional experience, analytical skills and some relevant experience so you could build on previous experience through a graduate development programme or real estate experience.

Whilst many students have an RICS accredited degree, there are opportunities for non-cognate graduates to join a firm and study for a property qualification whilst working.

More information Visit RICS

Visit Prospects

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management

MSc Real Estate

MBA Construction and Real Estate

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Doing deals and making transactions
  • Using mathematical and business skills in areas such as strategy and financial modelling

See more skills used by property finance and investment specialists:

  • Using a wide range of data such as verbal, written, numerical and perceptual information
  • Analysing and identifying patterns in data
  • Working with different people such as clients and specialists
Property planning and development

Planning and development work is a specialism within the broader real estate sector. Specialists in this area work at both strategic policy and operational levels. Their work impacts on the physical aspects of the built and natural environment, as well as social, economic and environmental aspects.

Practice area

Planning and development

Introduction Development surveyors’ source, appraise, value, and sell a wide range of land and property, including housing, retail and commercial premises. They oversee development projects, including residential, commercial and public builds, working with other professionals, managing budgets ensuring that all compliance, safety and risk management standards are met.

Development surveyors also focus on maximising the value and return of assets, assessing the performance of an investor’s portfolio to ensure profitability and value.

What skills are required?
  • Excellent communication skills, including negotiation skills
  • Drive and the ability to build relationships and networks and generate new business
  • The ability to work well with clients and other professionals.
  • Commercial awareness
  • Strong organisation skills
  • Attention to detail
What qualifications are required? A non-cognate or RICS accredited degree may be required, with most surveyors working towards Chartered status with the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS).
What is it like in practice? Development surveyors usually work in the private sector, advising on all aspects of the development process, however public sector opportunities also exist.

You will need to liaise with clients and understand their business needs and objectives, as well as working with and supporting other professionals. Development is an area which requires high level communication and interpersonal skills, developing and maintain relationships with current and potential clients and industry specialists. The environment is often dynamic and demanding and uses real estate expertise and knowledge of the build life cycle to identify and achieve the world’s future sustainable development needs.

Work environment Split between office and site visits with client meetings and presentations. Travel is often required and a flexible approach to working hours may be expected as projects reach critical points.
Employment opportunities Employers include planning consultancies, firms of chartered surveyors, commercial development companies, public utilities, landowners, private developers, house builders and housing associations and large commercial retail, banking and entertainment organisations with in-house estates departments.

Firms may recruit graduates on to a graduate development programme, but opportunities exist for these with more general experience to specialise. Opportunities are available in the UK and globally.

Whilst many students have an RICS accredited degree, there may be opportunities for non-cognate graduates to join a firm and study for a property qualification whilst working.

There are also degree apprenticeships in real estate surveying available which could lead to a career in this specialism.

More information Visit RICS

Visit Prospects

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management

MSc Real Estate

MBA Construction and Real Estate

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using verbal communication skills to negotiate and generate new business
  • Project Management

See more skills used by property planning and development surveyors:

  • Using a wide range of data such as verbal, written, numerical and perceptual information
  • Analysing and identifying patterns in data
  • Working with different people such as clients and specialists
  • Doing deals and making transactions
Quantity surveying

Quantity surveyors manage all costs relating to building and civil engineering projects, from the initial calculations to the final figures.

Practice area

Quantity surveying

What skills are required?
  • A practical and logical mind and a methodical way of thinking
  • Creativity and problem solving
  • Strong numeracy skills
  • Excellent IT skills
  • Report writing and communications skills
  • Attention to detail
What qualifications are required? An RICS accredited degree in quantity surveying may be required. Most quantity surveyors will work towards professional membership of the RICS (Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors) and/or the Chartered Institute of Building.
What is it like in practice? Quantity surveyors are employed by a wide range of firms of all sizes. The major employers are contractors, who are responsible for the build budget, and consultancies who work for the client who has commissioned the project, managing aspects such as design, tenders and contracts.

Global opportunities exist for quantity surveyors, particularly those with several years post qualification experience or specialist industry experience.

Work environment If you work for a contractor, you will usually be based on site. If you work for a consultancy, you will be more office based. Quantity surveyors can cover large geographical areas and so a driving licence is usually requited.
Employment opportunities Firms often advertise for graduate with a quantity surveying degree, although trainee roles and non-cognate roles are also available.

There are also degree apprenticeships in quantity surveying available.

More information Visit RICS

Visit Target Jobs

Visit AcostE

Visit Prospects

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying

MSc Quantity Surveying

BSc (Hons) Construction Management

MSc Construction Management

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using numbers and IT systems to manage finance and budgets
  • Project management

See more skills used by quantity surveyors:

  • Working with different people such as clients and specialists
  • Managing people and leadership
  • Creativity and problem solving
Real estate

Real estate is defined as property in the form of land or buildings, and real estate surveyors work across a wide range of markets and activities.

Practice area

Real estate

Introduction Real estate surveyors could be involved with the management, purchase, sale or leasing of land and property. The focus may be on maximising the value and return of as asset and can range from a single building to a multi-million-pound portfolio.
What skills are required?
  • Excellent communication skills and the ability to work well with clients and other professionals
  • Commercial awareness as many surveyors work in fee earning roles
  • Drive and the ability to build relationships and networks and generate new business
  • Some roles require strong numeracy skills
What qualifications are required? A non-cognate or RICS accredited degree may be required, with most surveyors working towards chartered status with the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS).
What is it like in practice? Real estate surveyors may work in the public sector or in private practice, and often to choose to specialise in either commercial or residential markets.

Specialist areas include: agency, asset management, landlord and tenant work and property management. Many graduates work in range of departments before specialising.

Surveyors may work on a one-off project for a client, or be retained on a longer-term basis, for example to manage a property portfolio.

Usual office hours apply, although some flexibility and travel may be required.

Work environment Split between office and site work.
Employment opportunities Larger firms recruit graduates on to graduate development programmes, giving participants the opportunity to work across a number of different departments before choosing their specialisms. Smaller firms recruit all year round, offering both specialist and general practice work.

Whilst many students have an RICS accredited degree, there are opportunities for non-cognate graduates to join a firm and study for a property qualification whilst working.

There are also degree apprenticeships in real estate surveying available.

More information Visit RICS

Visit Prospects

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management

MSc Real Estate

MBA Construction and Real Estate

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Working with different people such as clients, colleagues and the general public
  • Doing deals and making transactions

See more skills used by real estate agents:

  • Managing people and leadership
  • Creativity and problem solving
  • Using verbal and written communication skills
  • Analysing and identifying patterns in data
Research

Specialists in this area carry out industry research which is then applied to a wide range of projects and publications.

Practice area

Research

What skills are required?
  • Excellent communication skills and the ability to work well with clients and other professionals
  • Data management
  • Research methodologies and techniques
  • An understanding of the real estate and other relevant markets
  • Attention to detail
  • Ability to share and communicate research findings in different formats, suitable for a range of audiences
What qualifications are required? A first degree or post graduate degree is usually expected, alongside training and experience in statistical analysis and drawing conclusions from data. Research specialists can work towards chartered status with the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS) but may also obtain other academic and research focused qualifications.
What is it like in practice? Your role might include data collection and analysis, and the production of market reports and publications. You will work with other real estate specialists and clients to fulfil their research needs and communicate this is an accessible manner
Work Environment Mainly office based, including meetings, presentations and client engagement
Employment opportunities Employers include property consultancies and chartered surveying firms, private investment firms, banks and investment firms. Global and domestic opportunities exist. Graduate roles are available as well as a good range of more senior and experienced roles.
More information Visit RICS
Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management

MSc Real Estate

MBA Construction and Real Estate

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Analysing and identifying patterns in data
  • Researching and explaining data

See more skills used by researchers:

  • Working with different people such as clients, colleagues and specialists
  • Using mathematical and statistical skills
  • Using verbal and written communication skills
Rural practice

Rural practice surveyors provide practical and strategic knowledge to clients involved in rural land and property. This type of surveying shares many skills and activities with real estate, but its focus is on the maintenance and enhancement of a healthy rural environment and the functioning of a vibrant rural economy.

Practice area

Rural practice

Introduction Whist rural practice surveyors will be expected to have a broad base of knowledge, they may also become specialists in areas including agriculture, auctioneering and valuation, forestry, property management and environmental issues.
What skills are required?
  • Excellent communication skills such as negotiation, tact and diplomacy
  • The ability to work well with a wide range of clients and stakeholders
  • Commercial and business awareness
  • A passion and understanding of rural issues and a genuine interest in the countryside
  • Some numeracy skills, such as the ability to analyse and present statistical information
  • Problem solving
  • Team working
What qualifications are required? A non-cognate or RICS accredited degree is often required, with most surveyors working towards chartered status with the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS)
What is it like in practice? Rural practice surveyors can work in the public sector, in private practice or directly for corporate or private landowners. The job can be varied, and include estate management, where you might manage a team of estate employees, landlord and tenant matters, valuations, advising on specialist areas such a rural grants, strategic planning and the selling, buying and marketing of rural assets.

These can include farms, residential properties, sporting rights, rights of way and access, forestry, industrial units and workshops

Usual office hours apply, although some flexibility will be required as you will need to fit in with your client and some weekend working may be required too.

You can expect to travel around the geographical area you work in and have a full driving licence.

Work environment Split between office and travel to and in the estate or region. You may be outside a great deal and in all weathers.
Employment opportunities Larger firms recruit graduates on to graduate development programmes. Smaller firms recruit all year round.

Whilst many students have an RICS accredited degree, there are opportunities for non-cognate graduates to join a firm and study for a property qualification whilst working.

There are also degree apprenticeships in real estate surveying available which can lead to work in rural practice.

More information Visit RICS

Visit Prospects

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management

MSc Real Estate

MBA Construction and Real Estate

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Working with different people such as clients, colleagues, tenants, businesses and the general public
  • Applying business and strategy skills in the rural environment

See more skills used by rural practice surveyors:

  • Researching and explaining data
  • Using verbal and written communication skills
  • Doing deals and making transactions
  • People management and leadership
Safety, health, environment and quality (SHEQ) management

SHEQ specialists focus on the safety, health, environment and quality assurance side of the business.

Practice area

Safety, health, environment and quality (SHEQ) management

Introduction Whilst a SHEQ manager may take responsibility for all these aspects, a SHEQ team member may be responsible for one particular area, such as compliance. SHEQ specialists are responsible for designing, implementing and monitoring SHEQ polices and activities on site, supervising and coordinating work systems to ensure that the products or services of the company meet the highest quality standards and that working conditions are favourable and safe. Their role should be a key one in an organisation, promoting SHEQ as a core business value and developing a mature culture towards continuous improvement.
What skills are required?
  • Excellent communication and relationship building skills
  • Ability to work with and influence others at all levels of the workforce
  • Coaching skills
  • IT skills such as EXCEL
  • Record keeping and report writing
  • Accuracy and attention to detail
  • Ability to drive and embed change
  • Effective verbal and written communication skills
  • Planning and organising skills
What qualifications are required?
  • Previous experience in a relevant area such as facilities management/ building services/ construction arena may be required
  • NEBOSH qualifications
  • IOSH Membership
  • Management experience
  • A full driving licence
What is it like in practice? SHEQ specialists may have responsibility for developing SHEQ policies and working with senior management teams to embed these into the culture of an organisation.

SHEQ specialists work on site, delivering frontline SHEQ advice and training to line managers and the work force. SHEQ specialists will advise, guide and coach line managers and workers on the implementation of the health, safety and environmental management systems.

Some duties can include hands on practical tasks such as carrying out fire and health and safety assessments or incident investigations.

SHEQ specialist use report writing and record keeping to monitor and report on contract performance and policy implementation.

Some SHEQ specialists may attend advise on business submissions and attend meetings with sub-contractors and clients.

Work environment Your time will be split between the office sites, depending on your role. The job is a busy, active one with lots of contact with other stakeholders.
Employment opportunities SHEQ specialists are employed by construction firms, and by enforcement bodies such as the Health and Safety Executive.

Entry level SHEQ positions are available, alongside roles for more experienced workers. Applicants may have a site or construction management background or come from other industries. A degree is not usually required (although senior roles may specify this as a requirement) but SHEQ advisers usually require NEBOSH qualifications and may become chartered.

International opportunities are available, usually for more experienced workers

More information Visit CIOB
Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Construction Management

MSc Construction Management

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • People management and leadership
  • Practical or technical skills and knowledge

See more skills used by SHEQ specialists:

  • Researching and explaining data
  • Using verbal and written communication skills
  • Working with different people such as clients, contractors’ colleagues and the general public
  • Using perceptual skills interpret maps, charts and diagrams
  • Creativity and problem solving
Site manager

Site managers oversee and organise day to day site operations such as labour schedules, staff inductions, sub-contractor management, risk management, health and safety compliance and safe storage and co-ordination of materials.

Practice area

Site manager

Introduction Site managers have a significant focus on ensuring that a building project is completed safely, within an agreed time frame and budget.
What skills are required?
  • Good communication and leadership skills
  • Planning and organisation
  • Strong attention to detail
  • Commercial awareness
What qualifications are required?
  • You many need a current and valid UK driving licence
  • Relevant health and safety courses
  • Site Management Safety Training Scheme certification
  • First aid training
What is it like in practice? Site managers may have responsibility for a small project or be part of a construction management team on larger or more complex builds. Due to the nature of the role, it is project based. Some site managers are self-employed, moving from one contract to another, however, many people work for one employer.

Site managers need to keep accurate records and submit documents such as progress reports.

Site management is a busy, demanding role so you will need the ability to work under pressure.

You may need some flexibility on working hours as projects near completion.

Work environment Your time will be mainly spent on site, maybe in a temporary office. The role may require liaison with other professionals, sub-contractors and clients.  You may also need to participate in site meetings.
Employment opportunities There is a wide range of employers from global construction companies to small building firms, recruit site managers. Recruitment agencies are often used, although some firms recruit direct.

From site management, you could progress to more senior roles in construction management or develop specialisms in areas such as SHEQ.

More information Visit Go Construct
Relevant UCEM programmes MSc Quantity Surveying

BSc (Hons) Construction Management

MSc Construction Management

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • People management and leadership
  • Practical or technical skills and knowledge

See more skills used by site managers:

  • Project management
  • Using verbal and written communication skills
  • Working with different people such as clients, contractors, colleagues and the general public
  • Using perceptual skills interpret maps, charts and diagrams
  • Creativity and problem solving
Structural engineering

Structural engineers work with architects and other built environment professionals to design and maintain structures, so they remain stable and secure throughout the build life cycle.

Practice area

Structural engineering

Introduction Structural engineering appeals to people who have an interest in using maths, physics, art or design to create an innovative and sustainable built environment.
What skills are required?
  • Strong communication skills
  • Problem-solving ability
  • Analytical skills
  • Maths and IT skills, such as 3D visualisation and conceptual skills
  • Teamwork and the ability to liaise well with professionals from other disciplines
  • Attention to detail
  • An interest in the design and structure of buildings
What qualifications are required? Entry into structural engineering is typically via an engineering degree or similar qualification. Both under and post graduate degrees are available. Structural engineers can work towards the professional status with the Institute of Structural Engineers
What is it like in practice? Structural engineers design structures to withstand the stresses and pressures imposed through environmental conditions and human use. As specialists, they may determine the suitability of a site for construction, identify potential challenges for architects, work with existing buildings to assess damage and repairs and have expertise in the range and qualities of building materials and how they can be used.

Structural engineers can work on a huge range of buildings, including domestic, commercial and industrial projects. They also work on historic, conservation and iconic buildings, making and adapting buildings to meet the needs of the people who live and work in them.

Work environment Your time will be split between working on site and working from an office. Team working and working with other professionals is usually required as well as presentation and liaison with clients.
Employment opportunities Opportunities exist in the UK, Europe and globally. Firms usually expect a relevant degree and relevant experience for more senior roles.

Most structural engineers work for specialist consultancies which range from multinational firms to niche practices. Other employers include aircraft manufacturers, oil companies and railway operators.

There are also degree apprenticeships in structural engineering available.

More information Visit ISTRUCTE

Visit Prospects

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Construction Management

MSc Construction Management

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using science, technology and design to understand how buildings are constructed and materials used in the process
  • Using visual intelligence and perceptual skills to use plan, charts and diagrams

See more skills used by structural engineers:

  • Researching and explaining data in specialist areas
  • Working in teams
  • Maths skills
  • Using specialist IT programmes and equipment
Town planning

Town planners manage the competing demands on the use of space, balancing social, economic and environmental needs to shape the way that towns and cities grow.

Practice area

Town planning

Introduction Planning covers a very broad area, but work can include designing new towns or villages, ensuring legislation is upheld, protecting historical and important buildings and ensuring that suitable land becomes available for development
What skills are required?
  • Excellent communication skills, including negotiation skills
  • The ability to work well with clients, communities and other professionals.
  • Commercial awareness
  • Strong organisation skills
  • Attention to detail
  • Project management skills
  • Creative thinking, problem-solving and analytical skills to come up with imaginative solutions to planning problems
What qualifications are required? A non-cognate or RTPI accredited degree is usually required. Planners can work towards chartered status with the Royal Institute of Town Planners (RTPI)
What is it like in practice? Town planning is a varied area and many people choose to specialise in one particular area, such as urban design or conservation.

Town planners assess planning applications, consulting with stakeholders, carrying out relevant research and data analysis. They may need to negotiate with developers and other professionals, attend public presentations and present at planning boards, appeals and public inquiries

Work Environment Mainly office based but with some site visits and client meetings or presentations
Employment opportunities Town planners can work in the public sector for local or national government bodies, although opportunities also exist in the private sector, in planning consultancies, firms of chartered surveyors, and public utilities.

Whilst many students have an RTPI accredited degree, there may be opportunities for non-cognate graduates to study for a planning qualification whilst working.

An apprenticeship route is also available.

More information Visit RTPI

Visit Prospects

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management

MSc Real Estate

MBA Construction and Real Estate

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using technology and design skills to develop innovative solutions
  • Using perceptual skills to interpret maps, charts and diagrams

See more skills used by town planning specialists:

  • Project management
  • Using verbal and written communication skills
  • Working with different people such as clients, contractors, and the general public
  • Creativity and problem-solving
  • Analysing and identifying patterns in data
Valuation of businesses and intangible assets

Valuation of businesses and intangible assets is a specialism of real estate. Specialist business valuers can work in both the public and private sector and practice the valuation of both small businesses and large corporations.

Practice area

Valuation of businesses and intangible assets

What skills are required?
  • Excellent numeracy with the ability to with financial models
  • Analytical and data skills
  • Excellent communication skills and the ability to work well with clients and other professionals.
  • Report writing
  • Commercial awareness and business understanding
What qualifications are required? Many employers will ask for a relevant degree in areas such as finance and accountancy.

Specialists in this area may work towards chartered status with the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS).

What is it like in practice? Specialists in this area are concerned with valuing non-monetary assets.  Unlike other valuation surveyors, in this area, the specialist is assessing the value of something which has no physical existence, such as the good will created by a brand or business, its intellectual property, or research and development. The entity being valued has some economic benefit or impact for the owner, despite being intangible.
Work Environment Mostly office based but with visits to clients and other premises
Employment opportunities Specialists in this area usually work for specialist consultancies. Firms are often global and offer a range of business and financial diligence and assessments services.
More information Visit RICS
Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management

MSc Real Estate

MBA Construction and Real Estate

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using maths and business skills to make calculations and support professional advice
  • Analysing and identifying patterns in data

See more skills used by intangible asset specialists:

  • Using verbal and written communication skills
  • Using perceptual skills to interpret maps, charts and diagrams
  • Researching and explaining data
Valuation

Valuation is a specialism of real estate and surveyors usually specialise in either commercial or residential work.

Practice area

Valuation

Introduction Valuers assess the value of properties by applying expert knowledge and awareness of the local property markets. Valuations can be carried out for a variety of purposes including insurance, development, probate and loans or mortgages.
What skills are required?
  • Numeracy
  • Excellent communication skills and the ability to work well with clients and other professionals.
  • Report writing
  • Commercial awareness as many surveyors work in fee earning roles.
What qualifications are required? A non-cognate or RICS accredited degree may be required, with most Surveyors working towards Chartered status with the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS).

Valuers can also apply to be included in the RICS List of registered valuers, demonstrating they are experts in their field.

What is it like in practice? Valuation surveyors may work in the public sector, for residential valuation firms or in private practice.

Commercial valuers work on offices, industrial, retail, alternatives and mixed-use buildings.

Residential valuers work on housing, residential development projects and conversion projects.

Usual office hours apply, although some flexibility and travel are usually required. Some valuation surveyors work from home.

Valuers need to have some level of physical fitness to enable them to successfully access and inspect buildings. A driving licence is usually required.

Work environment Split between office and site work.
Employment opportunities Larger firms recruit graduates on to graduate development programmes, giving participants the opportunity to work across a number of different departments before choosing their specialisms. Smaller firms recruit all year round, offering both specialist and general practice work.

Whilst many students have an RICS accredited degree, there are opportunities for non-cognate graduates to join a firm and study for a property qualification whilst working.

There are also degree apprenticeships in valuation surveying available.

More information Visit RICS

Visit Prospects

Visit Civil Service Careers

Relevant UCEM programmes BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management

MSc Real Estate

MBA Construction and Real Estate

You might like this role if you enjoy:

  • Using maths skills make calculations and support professional advice
  • Analysing and identifying patterns in data

See more skills used by valuation surveyors:

  • Working with different people such as clients, colleagues and the general public
  • Using verbal and written communication skills
  • Using perceptual skills to interpret maps, charts and diagrams
  • Researching and explaining data
  • Understanding how buildings are constructed and how the materials used in the process